Northeast deserves a state representative with the urgency and experience to tackle Minnesota's inequities.


 

My Story

In the 1950s my grandparents immigrated to the United States from Mexico and El Salvador. Like many immigrants, including nearly all of the families of the 2nd graders in my Columbia Heights classroom, they left home with the hope that this country would be the start to a better life. For them, education was a powerful tool for upward mobility.

If my grandparents would have immigrated to Minnesota in 2017, their chances of success would look very different. In educationjobshousing, and upward mobility our state has many of the worst racial disparities in the entire country. And in many ways, those gaps have gotten worse, not better, over the past 40 yearsWe can and we must do better as a state. 

We need state legislators who have first-hand experience addressing and solving these inequities. As a teacher, my students deserve a fierce advocate not only in education policy, but also in transit, healthcare, immigration, affordable housing, and all the other policies that I've seen impact their lives. 

Northeast Minneapolis has been a success story for generations of immigrant families, from Polish, Lebanese, and Ukrainian immigrants in the past to Somali, Ecuadoran, and Middle Eastern immigrants today. Ensuring that remains true for all future generations requires someone with the urgency, experience, and mindset to tackle Minnesota's inequities head-on. We need someone like that at the state Capitol. I believe I can be that person. 

 Introducing Minnesota Commissioner of Education Dr. Brenda Cassellius in September 2016 in Minneapolis

Introducing Minnesota Commissioner of Education Dr. Brenda Cassellius in September 2016 in Minneapolis

 With my parents and grandparents in 1991. My Salvadoran American grandfather Miguel Hernandez and Mexican American grandmother Eloisa Perez immigrated to San Francisco in the 1950s. 

With my parents and grandparents in 1991. My Salvadoran American grandfather Miguel Hernandez and Mexican American grandmother Eloisa Perez immigrated to San Francisco in the 1950s.